How to use Virgin PTFE Rod

PTFE Rod is a remarkable product. PTFE – Polytetrafluoroethylene was discovered on April 6, 1938 by Dr. Roy Plunkett at the DuPont research laboratories. And this original PTFE was further developed by Dupont, and was released as a product in 1945.

This product is extremely chemical resistant, and can handle temperatures above 500 degrees. One of the first household uses for PTFE is the ‘PTFE Coated Frying Pan’. While this pan works very well, it is a different process than the PTFE Rod and Sheet we supply. It is a sprayed on coating that is almost black in color, where the pure PTFE Rod and Sheet is bright white in PTFE Round Rod Steam Valve Packingcolor.

What are some of the uses for PTFE TFE Rod?

Because PTFE exhibits high temperature and chemical resistance, it is commonly used in valve applications. From simple steam / hot water valves to high heat, caustic chemical valves in the fluid handling industries. This material is a semi-rigid to rigid plastic, and can be machined very easily – one of the easiest plastics to work with. The PTFE rod can be machined to very close tolerance, and in most small diameter rod it is supplied with a +.002″/-.00″ on the diameter (check for tolerance on your requested size). The chemical resistance is one of the key properties associated with the material. In sheet or thin sheet (film) PTFE is used as gasket material for similar high heat and chemical resistant flange and seals.

PTFE RodPTFE sheet and film - used as gasket material

Since 1945 Dupont has been the world leader in producing PTFE resins. Over the last couple of years, with the global shortage of Fluorspar (a key ingredient in producing all Fluoropolymer Plastics) Dupont has made some changes to their product offerings. Included in this change is a discontinuation of the production of one of most common granular molding powder (resin) used in the production of PTFE Rod and Sheet. This has the industry in a panic, the remaining global suppliers of PTFE resin are scrabbling to fill the void left by this decision. What does this mean to you? If you are used to purchasing PTFE rod or sheet, you may find the base materials may not be from Dupont. Our suppliers have small amounts of the Dupont resin, but mostly are replacing their raw materials with molding powder from other manufacturers. It may be, in the very near future, that all PTFE rod and PTFE sheet may not be made from Dupont brand resin.

Click here for current pricing on PTFE Rod.

UHMW rod is also a very slippery plastic material, but it does not take the high heat the PTFE rod does.

If you are one of the many clients that need this material, please contact us for clarification, information, supply chain news and possible changes in sources of supply. Call us at 866-832-9315 or email us here.

Thank you,

Industrial Plastic Supply

Before You Choose, read 7 Things You Must Know When Choosing Your PTFE Sheet Suppliers.

Google+ – Hayden Hess


Can we get colored Acetal – Delrin Rod?

We get this question frequently. The easy answer is yes, however, the most common available colors are Black and Natural (white in color). But to continue the thought, we have several manufacturers that run ‘Medical’ grades of Acetal – Delrin in several colors. Colored Acetal - Delrin Rod - Pomalux These materials are special run, but can frequently purchase by the standard length without a custom run. The biggest factor may be the price. The colored Acetal – Delrin materials are dramatically more expensive.

Colored Acetal – Delrin Rod

While price is a factor, the benefits may out weigh the cost. Many of our clients use these colored rods to help differentiate their product from their competition. With colors that can come close to a logo color or match a machine, these advantages are clearly visible. Having a special color available to machine small to medium runs of your product can save you thousands over molding a new part for trials. What colors can I get in Acetal – Delrin Rod? The range is a bit limited, but does include: brown, dark blue, dark green, gray, light blue, light green, red, rust and yellow (and of course Natural and Black). For details on the properties of these materials click here: Acetal – Delrin. For specifics on your requirement, please contact us for availability and pricing. Email or call 866-832-9315

Looking for the differences between Acetal and Delrin materials, click here.

Google+ – Hayden Hess


Plastics In Natural Disasters

The world is an ever changing and frequently hostile environment. Damage can be caused by a range of factors: from storms, floods and tornados to fires, hurricanes and earthquakes – all natural disasters.

This is certainly evident in the recent earthquakes and tsunami that ravaged Japan and Haiti. In addition, we have man made disasters. The nuclear concerns in Japan have captivated people’s attention throughout the globe. The Gulf Oil Spill is an example of another environmental disaster. Plastic materials are the perfect choice in prevention, preparedness and clean up from natural disasters.

 

Plastics in disaster preparedness.

Many plastic materials are used in the prevention, control and repair management – whenever and wherever a natural disaster may occur.

Polycarbonate Window Screen - Protecting against Natural Disasters

One of the most visible plastics is the Polycarbonate used in hurricane window covers / shutters. Polycarbonate is a clear rigid plastic that has extremely high impact strength, and is the material most commonly known as ‘Bullet Resistant Glazing’. It is used in safety glasses, riot shields and bank theft prevention glazing. The Polycarbonate protects windows and inhabitants from flying debris and breaking glass caused by the high winds, hurricanes and tornados. Use of the Polycarbonate window coverings saves homes from damage, and helps reduce insurance premiums.

Hillsides are affected by storms and heavy rains, causing mud slides. The standard and most popular solution is to cover hillsides with Polyethylene film. This helps to prevent the rains from saturating the ground and causing the ground to move or shift. The Poly film is normally .004” – .010” thick in widths up to 20 feet and lengths of 100 feet (the same material used as painters tarps from home improvement centers). This film is then attached to the hill with spikes, stakes or sand bags; and this material sheds the water rather than letting it soak in. It can be applied with folds and used like rain gutters to direct water flow away from specific areas. Also, the current sand bags used are not the old cotton fabric bags used years ago; they are now a high strength and tear resistant woven polypropylene ‘fabric’ bag.

 

The recent critical issues with nuclear leaks bring up an interesting use of a plastic material. As you may recall, after the earthquake and tsunami, the Japanese energy experts were pumping water and boron into the reactors to help control the amount of nuclear energy released. Boron Filled Polyethylene Helps Protect Against Radiation DisastersThe nuclear industry uses a plastic material, High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) that has been filled with the natural mineral boron. This boron filled (typically a 5% boron fill) is used to shield neutrons and nuclear energy in many applications; nuclear submarines, nuclear power plants, hospital radiation, dental x-ray shielding and industrial radiation applications. It is normally produced in sheet, and can then be mounted in and around the radiation source as shielding. The benefit to using this boron filled HDPE is this sheet weighs significantly less than traditional lead shielding, and is therefore much easier to install.

 

Plastic used in clean up from disasters

It is much more difficult to clean up after natural disasters occur. Many of the methods used in the preparation limit the amount of clean up caused by natural disasters.

Depending on the severity of the natural disaster, the uses of plastics in the aftermath are almost limitless. In the cleanup and rebuild after major Earthquakes, shelter is a key component. One of the quick shelters brought in are simple wooden frames with twin-wall plastic sheets made from either Polypropylene or Polycarbonate stapled or nailed to the framework. This provides an inexpensive, easily movable and effective shelter for short term housing. The twin-wall design provides excellent insulation and energy savings. This style shelter is foldable, easy to transport and very easy to set up. Several versions can be made from small huts to larger family areas, to separate sanitary latrine units. These extruded twin-wall materials work well to protect against rain and excessive exposure to the elements. These can be used as assembled, or with a sand bag reinforced perimeter. In Haiti, there were reports of residents filling used one gallon water bottles with mud, and building shelters with these mud building blocks.

The gulf oil spill brought plastics to the front line in disaster cleanup again. Materials used to collect and dispose of excess oil from the waters were rushed to the area. Polyethylene bags are used to collect the oil covered and saturated cleaning rags and clothes, preventing additional dispersion. Many varieties of machinery were brought in to clean the waters. One style machine uses 8” UHMW rod as a squeegee roller that grabs the oil from the water surface and then collects it for later use. Oil booms and rotary wheels are common systems for collecting oil from spills. Because plastics have great surface tension, the oil ‘sticks’ to the plastic surface during the cleaning process. Then the plastic surfaces are wiped clean for reuse and capturing the oil. Plastic tubes and hoses are used to move the oil after collection.

A significant use of plastics would be in the aftermath of natural disasters, specifically in the sanitation and clean water areas. First is sanitation; plastics are used in keeping items clean and dry. Polyethylene film covers items such as medical supplies, shelters, clothing and food cartons. This film keeps the items protected during shipment and ready for use.

Water is the second area of concern. Clean water is critical during the clean up and resettling after a natural disaster. Individual use water bottles are the quick and easy way to deliver water. Larger rotationally molded tanks are brought in with the ability to store large amounts of water in the areas affected. Reverse osmosis equipment (many components are made from plastic) is brought in to convert contaminated water in the clean potable water on site.

In all of these examples, plastic is lighter in weight than the alternatives, normally less expensive that the alternatives, it lasts longer and the plastics are recyclable.

Plastics are excellent choices for material to use in natural disasters.

Google+ – Hayden Hess

Is Nylon Food Grade



Is Nylon Rod and Sheet Food Grade

This question was very easy to answer, up until now.

First: what is Zytel 42? It is a Natural Nylon 6/6 extrusion grade plastic resin. An extremely popular and heavily used material for machinable and durable plastic parts. For as far back as we can find information, this Zytel 42 Nylon 6/6 resin has been used in numerous food contact and food processing machine components.dupont1 300x127 Is Nylon Food Grade

We have just received notice that Dupont will be making some changes to their formula for this Nylon grade. For years we have provided our clients with Dupont Zytel 42 Nylon resin extruded into sheet, rod and other profiles. The Dupont announcement states that the Zytel 42 will no longer have a food grade rating – FDA approval. They will produce a new resin called Zytel 42FG, which will have all the approvals we always had with the Zytel 42.

Why in the world would a company do such a thing? Our guess is that this is a cleaver way to increase prices significantly without a standard and blatant price increase. Let’s just hide it in a new resin package.

Nylon Sheet, Nylon Slab and Nylon Rod are all available as these:

Zytel 42 – will still be available, but without the FDA approval

Zytel 42FG – the ‘new’ resin will carry the FDA approval, but at much higher price

Nylon Food Grade still available

What is the difference between the old Zytel 42 and the new Zytel 42FG? From what we have read so far, nothing. It is probably the same material, new name. The ‘new’ Zytel 42 is actually the new ‘dumbed’ down resin – they just took away the Food Grade label, maybe took out an ingredient or two, and viola, new Zytel 42 – non Food Grade Nylon.

This news has spread quickly through our industry. As mentioned above, we have provided this material in this grade for over 36 years for Food Grade/FDA Approved applications.

The main reason for this article is to get the news out the the marketplace. Engineers and designers have been specifying this resin for their applications, and now, with out much notice, the product they assume is Food Grade will no longer be acceptable for these applications. It is unclear at this point whether the extrusion plants will be producing product from both resins, or opting to use one or the other. It appears that Nylon Food Grade resins my become a special, or that all materials may becomes standard as Nylon Food Grade.

Is Nylon Food Grade Resin Important To You?

This is the question we find ourselves asking. Does the end user think of Nylon when they are looking for an FDA approved plastic? Or, do they consider Acetal, Delrin, Polyethylene, and other materials first? Do you think of Nylon rod, bar, sheet and slab as mechanical materials to use when making gears, wear strips, and other non FDA applications?

Please take a moment and let us know you thoughts. We value your input – it will help us in evaluating the direction we want to go with our inventory.

Stay tuned, the rumor is that Dupont will be doing something similar to their Delrin 150 resins.

Check our main website for more details on these and other plastic materials – www.iplasticsupply.com

Thank you.

Google+ – Hayden Hess

Plastic Materials That Are UV Stable

Some of our most popular questions include “Is this material UV stable”, or “How long will this last in direct sunlight”, or something similar.

These are great questions. Just look at the ‘cheap’ backyard furniture you bought last year at the big box store, yep, it is faded and cracking. Why is that?

The quick answer is the material had either no UV (Ultra Violet Light) stabilizer or very, very little. Most plastic materials are not UV stable to start with, the main exception is Acrylic Sheeting which is virtually invisible to UV.

All other plastic materials need a little something extra to give it the protection it may need from the sun. Many plastic materials, if given the proper additives, can be used in direct sunlight for 10 – 15 years (or longer) giving excellent performance. UV Stable Playground HDPE Sheet

The first factor in picking such a material is the intended use. Not all materials are good candidates for all applications.

While some materials will perform very well, others under the same conditions will fail. Please contact us for details on a material to meet your needs.
HDPE sheet is one of the best materials for long term outdoor use, if given the proper additives. Next time you drive by a children’s playground in your local city, look at the brightly colored panels used to make the play equipment. This is a HDPE sheet with some heavy UV additives, and this makes an excellent application. These UV stabilized HDPE sheets are available in a rainbow of colors and are able to be easily fabricated, this material is excellent for many outdoor applications.
If your application is more mechanical and will not be exposed to direct sunlight, other materials that you might use would be: Polycarbonate, UHMW, ABS (especially with Korad cover), Acetal, Noryl and many more.

Our standard Covestro Makrolon Polycarbonate is a UV stable material in sheet, and is frequently used in replacement glazing applications. The remaining materials on the list are available in Black (a carbon black pigment) which extends outdoor usage. While still not recommended for direct sunlight, they can be used with a good possibility of success – depending on design.

Plastic materials have a tendency to become brittle or lose properties over time with sun exposure, if material does not have enough or proper UV stabilization. When using the proper material that contains the proper additives or coating, you can expect years of trouble free service.


Additionally, many materials will work well if they are painted to cover the plastic surface. Many spray paints, especially Acrylic paints, last many years in the sun. Please check with us, as some material do not accept paints or coatings.


Take some time to review your requirements, and the properties of the plastic you intend to use. The right material will provide the best performance. Contact any of our Plasticologists for assistance, call 866-832-9315 or email us. You can always do research on materials at www.iplasticsupply.com

Google+ – Hayden Hess


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Is Lexan® the same as Makrolon® or Polycarbonate?

The short answer is no, are they very similar, yes. The reason is that both Lexan® and Makrolon® are brand names, along with Hyzod®, Cyrolon®, Zelux®, Paltuf®, Tuffak®, Ensicar®, Unicar®, Texin®, Apex® and many more. Lexan® is a brand name for SABIC (Saudi Basic Industries Corporation) which acquired the entire General Electric Plastics division several years ago. Makrolon® (formerly Hyzod®) is a trade name for Covestro (formerly Bayer MaterialSciences).

These materials are all Polycarbonate which is a very tough, high impact plastic material. The base resins are very similar, however, the end product varies quite a bit depending on the manufacturer. The Covestro Bayer Makrolon® GP-V material does meet the UL 94 V-0 flame retardant certification (at .220″ thick), and the Makrolon® GP is UL 94 HB rated.

How do I tell the difference between Lexan® and Makrolon®?

Bayer MaterialScience now Covestro

It would be impossible to tell the difference between brands by just looking, unless it still has the masking on, it would take some testing. The majority of both brands of materials are available in a very clear, UV stabilized glazing grade and look identical to the naked eye. This material is excellent for replacing window glass and is virtually unbreakable.

 

Industrial Plastic Supply stocks the Covestro (Bayer) Makrolon® GP Polycarbonate materials in stock and ready for shipment. We have chosen to carry the Covestro Makrolon® Polycarbonate because of its superior quality, physical properties and ratings. You will find these materials available as sheet and rod here. If you have further questions, or would like to see the data sheet on Makrolon® Polycarbonate and/or Lexan® Polycarbonate for comparison, please give us a call: 866-832-9315 or email: request@indplastic.com

This post is part of our effort to answer as many questions for you as possible, and to assist you in choosing the proper material for your applications, this is another very popular question we hear.

Yes, Lexan® and Makrolon® are both Polycarbonate materials. And we believe that the Covestro Makrolon® is the best Polycarbonate sheet available in the market place.

Google+ – Industrial Plastic Supply, Inc.

“What is a good material for vacuum forming?”


This is a
popular question received from clients. This question has a rather long answer. Most Thermoplastic materials are thermo-formable, and thus vacuum forming compatible. Some of the most common and easier materials for forming are listed below.

Common Vacuum Forming Materials:Vacuum Formed PETG Part

Each plastic material has a variety of different properties, and they form at different temperatures. The Acrylic, PETG and Polycarbonate sheets are normally clear (can be special ordered in colors), however the Polycarbonate may have to be heat dried prior to the vacuum forming temperature phase (depending on thickness).
ABS and HIS both form very well, and are normally White or Black. The ABS normally has a fine texture called Hair Cell on the primary surface, the Styrene is smooth on two sides. On a special basis Styrene and ABS can be run in almost any thickness up to .375″ thick, and in almost any color (minimums apply) and in a huge range of custom run sheet sizes.
While many other materials may be available for special applications and with various improved properties, these are the most commonly available and used materials.
Some of the important factors in choosing a material for your vacuum forming project would be: clarity, strength of finished part, temperature, depth of draw, UV resistance, Flame Retardant Rating, thickness and size range.
Vacuum Forming Mold 300x183 Looking For Vacuum Forming (Formable) PlasticsChocolate Molds 300x200 Looking For Vacuum Forming (Formable) Plastics

Large parts can be produced using this process, for example – Hot Tubs and Pick Up Truck Bed Liners. Also vacuum forming is used to produce very small parts like chocolate molds and numerous packaging applications.

Most vacuum formers started in their garage (or kitchen). A simple vacuum forming ‘machine’ can be produced at very low cost using 2 X 4 wood, peg board, and your shop vac. Obviously this is not the way the above hot tub was formed, but the process is rather simple and is much more an art than a science. We have seen several YouTube videos showing entry level – DIY style vacuum forming machines.  Most use the kitchen oven as the heat source and are used to make small chocolate molds, wax molds, hobby parts and more. Many materials can be used in this simple process, and we are happy to assist you with your basic questions of the vacuum forming process.
There are also a wide range of commercial thermoforming machines (see video) available, in almost unlimited range of sizes.

There is a wide array of materials that can be used, and they have different properties – no one material meets all your needs. Contact us for details on your vacuum forming requirements or with question.

Google+ – Hayden Hess


I thought Plastic was a Cheap Material?

We do hear this question regularly. And, maybe, in years gone by Plastic was that Cheap material.

Back in the 50′s and 60′s, plastics were very inexpensive, and were very limited in types and availability.

What cause this to change?

Plastics are primarily produced from Oil and several Oil by-products. As oil pricing has skyrocketed from the 50′s, so did the low end plastic material pricing.

In addition, a new generation of high tech, mechanical and engineering grades of plastic we developed. These plastics replace metals and other substrates in manufacturing. They out live, out perform most materials at a fraction of the cost of the material it replaces. broke chair 300x225 I Thought Plastic Was A Cheap Material...

Isn’t Cheap better?

All materials are not designed to the same standard. This is true with plastics as well. Choosing the wrong plastic for a project can be a costly mistake. All engineering perimeters should be considered: strength, impact, sunlight, water absorption, electrical resistance, temperature range, etc. We’ve all witnessed the ‘cheap’ plastic kids toy that lasts but a couple of days, the clip or cover in your car breaks off, the inexpensive outdoor furniture and so on. These are examples of under designed or choosing a material for its resin cost, not its physical properties. Thus, no, cheaper is not better. Cost should be just one of your decision criteria.

What Should You Do?

The answer is really quite easy. Ask.

Talk to one of our experienced ‘Plasticologists’ and tell them your requirements. You’re input, and a little time to answer some questions could save you enormous time and expense in your finished parts. All plastics are not created equal, and neither are all plastic suppliers. Give us a try, and take the guess-work out of choosing the right material for your job.

Some of our lower cost materials: HDPE, PVC, Styrene – less expensive, not cheap. Each with very specific strong points, and yes weak areas as well.

Cheap plastic is most likely not the best plastic.

Google+ – Hayden Hess

Acetal Versus Delrin


Is Delrin® the same as Acetal?

This is one of our most common questions, and is a bit difficult to answer.

All Delrin® is Acetal (PolyOxyMethylene or POM).

Acetal is the generic, and not all Acetal is Delrin®. Several manufacturers produce Acetal resin, including: Celanese®, BASF®, Ticona®, SABIC® and many more.

Copolymer versus Homopolymer AcetalAcetal vs Delrin®

Delrin® is a homo-polymer Acetal produced by Dupont. The generic Acetal covers both the homo-polymer Delrin® and the co-polymer grades of resin. Both materials meet the ASTM-D-4181, ASTM-D-6100 or ASTM-D-6778 specification (an old call out is L-P-392). Homo-polymer is POM111, and Co-polymer is POM211.

Both are tough and machinable, and have very similar properties.

An additional difference is the inherit problem of center-line porosity in the homo-polymer grades. This is caused by out gassing during manufacturing, and can be found at the center or on the surface of all homo-polymer extrusions. This porosity can cause problems with machining or moisture permeation through the material. The co-polymer resin does not have this porosity issue.

Some of the other differences are in the physical properties of the resin. Review the chart for some of the most popular properties people ask for when looking at Acetal or Delrin.

See Delrin® / Acetal properties chart below.

Properties Homo-Polymer Acetal Co-Polymer Acetal
Tensile Modulus of Elasticity 450,000 400,000
Flexural Modulus of Elasticity 470,000 366,000
Heat Deflection Temp @ 264 psi – degress F 257 220
Melting Point – degress F 347 335
Coef. of Linear Thermal Expansion 6.8 x 10-5 5.4 x 10-5
Water Absorption @ Saturation 0.90 0.80

Material is available as Delrin® Rod, Acetal Rod, Delrin® Block, Acetal Block, Delrin® Sheet, Acetal Sheet, and Slabs. Acetal is one of the most widely available plastics, especially on the West Coast (for some reason the East Coast like the Nylon – Polyamide material more). Most commonly available in Natural (White) or Black, but can be produced in a wide range of colors with minimum orders. This enables material matching your product color or for easy identification of parts.

While these properties are similar, depending on your application, one material may be better suited than the other. Review our Delrin® / Acetal page for additional information on the product availability and data sheets. We get calls for Delrin® product, only people may call it Delron, Delran, Delrun, Derlin and many other names, but it is still Delrin® to us.

Looking for other colors of Acetal – Delrin® Rod?

Contact us today for more information on Acetal – Delrin® or any other plastic material.

Call us at 866-832-9315 or Email Us for more additional details

Google+ – Hayden Hess

What is Oilon PV80



What is Oilon PV80

We have recently received a question from a client on an old product called Oilon PV80. This was one of the first attempts to make a plastic ‘slicker’, and they achieved this by adding an oil agent to Acetal resin. The Oilon PV 80 material failed miserably due to the oil additive not blending well with the base Acetal. The product had vastly uneven oil content throughout the extrusion. Don’t let this failure sway you away from Acetal products, as they are excellent machining and wear resistant materials, Acetal just doesn’t take the blending with oil. It does blend well with PTFE, and that is the very popular Delrin AF (also known as LF13) product and this is a common replacement for the Oilon PV 80.

Since then, our factories have figured it out, and they now use Nylon as a base. The Nylon has made this a widely accepted success providing excellent performance and longevity. With a few different versions, this product line works extremely well in OEM, Manufacturing and many Food Processing applications. Check out this and other Nylon varieties on the Nylon page. Look in the upper right corner for the variety of material you are interested in.

Oilon PV80 vs. Nylonsheave6 What is Oilon PV80

Nylon provides the best of all worlds when it comes to filled wear resistant materials. It is a rigid material with natural wear resistance. In addition, Nylon can be cast with a variety of fillers and additives (ie. Oil, Glass, Pigments, Graphite, etc.) that extend and improve many properties – and they are equally dispersed through out the material. The Nylon is superior in this blending process, whereas the Oilon PV80 did not blend well at all. Cast Nylon also is available in a huge range of sizes and shapes.

Also, let us know if you want more info on the old, antiquated and abandoned materials of old. Most of those old materials have been replaced by superior performance materials. Some of the older call outs were just trade names, like Bakelite (the first high pressure laminate – phenolic sheet). Some members of our team remember the first materials invented, and of course all the materials that followed. Give us a try.

While Nylon has been a staple for many years, the casting process has been perfected and is made in huge range of sizes and grades. Take a step up to one of the newer high tech grades of Nylon. Most Cast Nylons can be produced with a variety of fillers to meet the demanding design requirements you need.

Choose a newer and superior material, and forget the old Oilon PV80.

Google+ – Hayden Hess



Plastic Mentor – The Blog

This is the blogging platform for the website: www.iplasticsupply.comIndustrial Plastic Supply, Anaheim, CA – Industrial Plastic Supply in Anaheim, CA.

Industrial Plastic Supply has been serving the mechanical, industrial, medical, food processing and many other industries since 1975. We supply a huge range of plastic sheets, strip, slab, blocks, rods and tubes. With over 80 plastics in stock, we can assist with the materials you need.

As a method to bring a more informative and direct link to you, we created Plastic Mentor.

The focus of the Plastic Mentor Blog is to share information, educate, and answer your plastic material questions.

Please feel free to ask your tough question. One of our certified and experienced ‘Plasticologists’ will be happy to get back with you. Click Here to contact us. Also, we welcome you to call us with questions, problems, material inquiries, etc. Call us at 866-832-9315

Don’t be a stranger, send us an e-mail, call us or stop by our Anaheim, CA warehouse (2240 S. Dupont Drive, Anaheim, CA  92806). We would love to start a plastic relationship.

Google+ – Hayden Hess