I thought Plastic was a Cheap Material?

We do hear this question regularly. And, maybe, in years gone by Plastic was that Cheap material.

Back in the 50′s and 60′s, plastics were very inexpensive, and were very limited in types and availability.

What cause this to change?

Plastics are primarily produced from Oil and several Oil by-products. As oil pricing has skyrocketed from the 50′s, so did the low end plastic material pricing.

In addition, a new generation of high tech, mechanical and engineering grades of plastic we developed. These plastics replace metals and other substrates in manufacturing. They out live, out perform most materials at a fraction of the cost of the material it replaces. broke chair 300x225 I Thought Plastic Was A Cheap Material...

Isn’t Cheap better?

All materials are not designed to the same standard. This is true with plastics as well. Choosing the wrong plastic for a project can be a costly mistake. All engineering perimeters should be considered: strength, impact, sunlight, water absorption, electrical resistance, temperature range, etc. We’ve all witnessed the ‘cheap’ plastic kids toy that lasts but a couple of days, the clip or cover in your car breaks off, the inexpensive outdoor furniture and so on. These are examples of under designed or choosing a material for its resin cost, not its physical properties. Thus, no, cheaper is not better. Cost should be just one of your decision criteria.

What Should You Do?

The answer is really quite easy. Ask.

Talk to one of our experienced ‘Plasticologists’ and tell them your requirements. You’re input, and a little time to answer some questions could save you enormous time and expense in your finished parts. All plastics are not created equal, and neither are all plastic suppliers. Give us a try, and take the guess-work out of choosing the right material for your job.

Some of our lower cost materials: HDPE, PVC, Styrene – less expensive, not cheap. Each with very specific strong points, and yes weak areas as well.

Cheap plastic is most likely not the best plastic.

Google+ – Hayden Hess

Acetal Versus Delrin


Is Delrin® the same as Acetal?

This is one of our most common questions, and is a bit difficult to answer.

All Delrin® is Acetal (PolyOxyMethylene or POM).

Acetal is the generic, and not all Acetal is Delrin®. Several manufacturers produce Acetal resin, including: Celanese®, BASF®, Ticona®, SABIC® and many more.

Copolymer versus Homopolymer AcetalAcetal vs Delrin®

Delrin® is a homo-polymer Acetal produced by Dupont. The generic Acetal covers both the homo-polymer Delrin® and the co-polymer grades of resin. Both materials meet the ASTM-D-4181, ASTM-D-6100 or ASTM-D-6778 specification (an old call out is L-P-392). Homo-polymer is POM111, and Co-polymer is POM211.

Both are tough and machinable, and have very similar properties.

An additional difference is the inherit problem of center-line porosity in the homo-polymer grades. This is caused by out gassing during manufacturing, and can be found at the center or on the surface of all homo-polymer extrusions. This porosity can cause problems with machining or moisture permeation through the material. The co-polymer resin does not have this porosity issue.

Some of the other differences are in the physical properties of the resin. Review the chart for some of the most popular properties people ask for when looking at Acetal or Delrin.

See Delrin® / Acetal properties chart below.

Properties Homo-Polymer Acetal Co-Polymer Acetal
Tensile Modulus of Elasticity 450,000 400,000
Flexural Modulus of Elasticity 470,000 366,000
Heat Deflection Temp @ 264 psi – degress F 257 220
Melting Point – degress F 347 335
Coef. of Linear Thermal Expansion 6.8 x 10-5 5.4 x 10-5
Water Absorption @ Saturation 0.90 0.80

Material is available as Delrin® Rod, Acetal Rod, Delrin® Block, Acetal Block, Delrin® Sheet, Acetal Sheet, and Slabs. Acetal is one of the most widely available plastics, especially on the West Coast (for some reason the East Coast like the Nylon – Polyamide material more). Most commonly available in Natural (White) or Black, but can be produced in a wide range of colors with minimum orders. This enables material matching your product color or for easy identification of parts.

While these properties are similar, depending on your application, one material may be better suited than the other. Review our Delrin® / Acetal page for additional information on the product availability and data sheets. We get calls for Delrin® product, only people may call it Delron, Delran, Delrun, Derlin and many other names, but it is still Delrin® to us.

Looking for other colors of Acetal – Delrin® Rod?

Contact us today for more information on Acetal – Delrin® or any other plastic material.

Call us at 866-832-9315 or Email Us for more additional details

Google+ – Hayden Hess

What is Oilon PV80



What is Oilon PV80

We have recently received a question from a client on an old product called Oilon PV80. This was one of the first attempts to make a plastic ‘slicker’, and they achieved this by adding an oil agent to Acetal resin. The Oilon PV 80 material failed miserably due to the oil additive not blending well with the base Acetal. The product had vastly uneven oil content throughout the extrusion. Don’t let this failure sway you away from Acetal products, as they are excellent machining and wear resistant materials, Acetal just doesn’t take the blending with oil. It does blend well with PTFE, and that is the very popular Delrin AF (also known as LF13) product and this is a common replacement for the Oilon PV 80.

Since then, our factories have figured it out, and they now use Nylon as a base. The Nylon has made this a widely accepted success providing excellent performance and longevity. With a few different versions, this product line works extremely well in OEM, Manufacturing and many Food Processing applications. Check out this and other Nylon varieties on the Nylon page. Look in the upper right corner for the variety of material you are interested in.

Oilon PV80 vs. Nylonsheave6 What is Oilon PV80

Nylon provides the best of all worlds when it comes to filled wear resistant materials. It is a rigid material with natural wear resistance. In addition, Nylon can be cast with a variety of fillers and additives (ie. Oil, Glass, Pigments, Graphite, etc.) that extend and improve many properties – and they are equally dispersed through out the material. The Nylon is superior in this blending process, whereas the Oilon PV80 did not blend well at all. Cast Nylon also is available in a huge range of sizes and shapes.

Also, let us know if you want more info on the old, antiquated and abandoned materials of old. Most of those old materials have been replaced by superior performance materials. Some of the older call outs were just trade names, like Bakelite (the first high pressure laminate – phenolic sheet). Some members of our team remember the first materials invented, and of course all the materials that followed. Give us a try.

While Nylon has been a staple for many years, the casting process has been perfected and is made in huge range of sizes and grades. Take a step up to one of the newer high tech grades of Nylon. Most Cast Nylons can be produced with a variety of fillers to meet the demanding design requirements you need.

Choose a newer and superior material, and forget the old Oilon PV80.

Google+ – Hayden Hess



Plastic Mentor – The Blog

This is the blogging platform for the website: www.iplasticsupply.comIndustrial Plastic Supply, Anaheim, CA – Industrial Plastic Supply in Anaheim, CA.

Industrial Plastic Supply has been serving the mechanical, industrial, medical, food processing and many other industries since 1975. We supply a huge range of plastic sheets, strip, slab, blocks, rods and tubes. With over 80 plastics in stock, we can assist with the materials you need.

As a method to bring a more informative and direct link to you, we created Plastic Mentor.

The focus of the Plastic Mentor Blog is to share information, educate, and answer your plastic material questions.

Please feel free to ask your tough question. One of our certified and experienced ‘Plasticologists’ will be happy to get back with you. Click Here to contact us. Also, we welcome you to call us with questions, problems, material inquiries, etc. Call us at 866-832-9315

Don’t be a stranger, send us an e-mail, call us or stop by our Anaheim, CA warehouse (2240 S. Dupont Drive, Anaheim, CA  92806). We would love to start a plastic relationship.

Google+ – Hayden Hess